October 18th Rogue River Cast and Blast

As the month of October rolls along the steelhead fly fishing gets better and better. Throw in a little early waterfowl hunting and you have a Rogue River treat that is hard to beat. The mallards fell during the dawning morning. Pretty sure they are local birds. There is not a lot of migration noted yet. The newly arrived hatchery steelhead is a sure sign that the Autumn run from the lower canyon is filtering in. Sure is fun to have a strong and pulling fish on the line again. An Agent Orange pattern accounted for the hookup in the bottom of a deep run during the warmth of early afternoon.

October steelhead 2017

A freshly arrived Rogue River steelhead.

October Mallards

A pair of early season mallards and decoys.

Successful Agent Orange Fly Pattern

The Agent Orange with speckled spandex legs.

 

 

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Mid October – Hot Hatchery Bite At Modoc

I’ve been finding a lot of gill punched Rogue River hatchery fish as of late. Thank goodness for those second chance steelhead. They make the doldrums of Indian summer low-water days of October a little more interesting and pleasant.  That’s particularly true when you can hook up multiple fish with little hesitation out of a short little run of water when the bite is on. Looking forward to coming days of colder weather, rain and rising water. Bring on those fresh fish languishing down in the canyon.

Releasing a Rogue River Summer Steelhead – Early September

Not all fish are created equal. This small Rogue River hatchery steelhead goes back into the drink! Grow larger.

The water flow has lowered and the steelhead bite seems a little tentative. I felt several other steelhead “mouth” the fly. However I was a little slow on the hookup to the skinny water wary fish. Smaller flies have been the fish ticket. Try a size #10 Yellow Fork Tail Prince Nymph. A small G.R. Hare’s Ear Nymph is a good second choice.

Just Beat the Lightening & Rain on the Rogue River, Oregon

Rogue River Summer Steelhead

Keeping a firm grip on this slipper one. I can hear the arriving thunderstorm. Time to make book and get back to the vehicle.

Arriving only 20 minutes earlier, the run looked good. A large Halloween Spey and Prince Nymph combo of flies rose nothing in the slow water of the hole. I switched to a single Yellow Fork Tail Prince Nymph and swung that fly through the fast and slow water. The hit came suddenly downstream at about 50 ° in the slower water. Fish on! A jump and four or five runs back into the fast water and finally she began to give up the ghost. Measured a true 25 inch, and such a sweet return to the Rogue River for me.  Water flow : about 1720 CFS    Air Quality : Improving, but still plenty of smoke overhead.      Arriving : A loud thunder and lightening storm with good rain that wet all before I could get back to the vehicle.

September Rogue Steelhead

Cabela’s switch rod and a Prince Nymph capture this bright Rogue River September steelhead.

No Play Foul Weather August

Chetco Bar Forest Fire

Source of the foul air in the Rogue Valley. The massive Chetco Bar Fire that should have never been allowed to get this far.

Rogue Valley Smoke Cover

Needless to say, all the smoke from the fires have effected the Rogue Valley air quality for weeks now. A late August photo from south Medford, Oregon.

Forest Fires Oregon

Although the biggest, there are a number of forest fires burning in Oregon.

Chetco Bar Fire

Igniting in a “wilderness area” back on July 2, 2017 the forest fire has run wild in the Chetco River drainage bordering the Kalmiopsis Wilderness and the town of Brookings Oregon.