Classic Fly Pins For Christmas

I’ve been tying old classic fly patterns on decorative hook pins for Christmas. Here are a few of my favorites. The hat pin hooks are not easy to tie on. There is the difficulty of tying around the pin and it’s keeper. Number one is avoid the sharp point of the pin. Ouch! Almost any fly pattern can be tied on fly pin. I’m looking forward to trying a few new patterns this year!

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Classic Fly Pins For Christmas


For several years I’ve been tying old classic fly patterns on decorative hook pins for Christmas. Here are a few of my favorites. The hat pin hooks are not easy to tie on. There is a lot that you have to work around. Number one is avoid the sharp point of the pin. Ouch, but the results are sure worth it. The finished pins do look great worn on clothing lapel or hat brim.

Classic Fly Pins For Christmas


I tie old classic fly patterns on decorative hook pins for Christmas. Here are a couple of my favorites. The hat pin hooks are not easy to tie on. There is a lot that you have to work around. Important is to avoid the sharp point of the pin when wrapping thread and materials. Ouch!

Recent Rain Brought the Rogue Back Up

Yesterday’s steady rain throughout the Rogue Valley brought the Rogue River flow back up considerably. Except in the far upper reach, the river now doesn’t warrant a much of a visit; and besides that, the showers are expected to continue today.

Looks like a hockey stick to me. Up to nearly 4000 CFS. The color must be shot.

Looks like a hockey stick to me. Up to nearly 4000 CFS. The steelhead color must be gone with all that dirty flow from the tributaries.

Classic Fly Pins For Christmas


I’ve been tying old classic fly patterns on decorative hook pins for Christmas. Here are a few of my favorites. The hat pin hooks are not easy to tie on. There is a lot that you have to work around. Number one is avoid the sharp point of the pin. Ouch!

Trout and Morels

The Adams dry-fly. A good pattern to have for the early hatches on the Rogue River

The Adams dry fly. A good pattern to have for the early hatches on the Rogue River

Winter steelhead season ended so quickly, it was as if it didn’t happen. There are many ways to celebrate Spring, and two that are very fun are bug hatches and wild mushrooms. You might think it might be hard to combine the two, but between the river and the high mountains there are many opportunities.

The morel hatch on the valley floor had to come to an end eventually. Prospecting for fishing location never does. I came across these past-prime valley floor morels while bushwhacking a new stretch of river. Mental note to return earlier next year for a chance at them while they are still fresh.

While out fishing the Rogue River I found these old morels. A new spot. I'll have to check back earlier next year.

While out fishing the Rogue River I found these old morels. A new spot. I’ll have to check back earlier next year.

Since then the fishing and morel hunting has moved up into the higher elevations. With the opening of the general trout season many small waters are open to fishing. When they just happen to border with a morel area, so much the better.

Though these are low-key fishing adventures, they are memorable for the mountain solitude and scenery. If you, like me, savor the wild, there’s nothing like mountain redband trout and black morels in the Spring.

Nice and fresh. The first of the Morchella snyderi (Black Morels of the High Mountains)

Nice and fresh. The first of the Morchella snyderi (Black Morels of the High Mountains)

This small Oregon redband trout shows distinct par marks.

This small Oregon redband trout shows distinct par marks.