Classic Fly Pins For Christmas

I’ve been tying old classic fly patterns on decorative hook pins for Christmas. Here are a few of my favorites. The hat pin hooks are not easy to tie on. There is the difficulty of tying around the pin and it’s keeper. Number one is avoid the sharp point of the pin. Ouch! Almost any fly pattern can be tied on fly pin. I’m looking forward to trying a few new patterns this year!

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August Cutthroat and Rogue River Summer Steelhead

More January reflecting. Thinking back on August when the Rogue River ran high but without the stain and cold of January runoff. Sure the river will continue it’s winter antics but the conditions overall are improving as we near February.

Here’s a lucky day during late August 2016 when a Hobo Spey and Midnight Rainbow Carpetbagger Stonefly Nymph were the successful flies to use.

January Reflecting

Considering all the snow, ice, rain and high water of early January this year it is good to reflect back on the warm days and hot fish of summer on the Rogue River, Oregon. Early morning wet wading. Oh what a treat. It will be a while until we can do this again. In the meantime keep an eye on the weather and river flow. Winter steelhead fishing is next on the Rogue agenda, and with the high water flows, fish could be trickling in sooner than expected.

A diminutive Brown Fork Tail Prince Nymph working well. I like the pattern with a slight, yellow-brown tail. Today I was using  the pattern on the size 10 hook.

Three Minutes to Land a December Rogue River Steelhead

Found this fresh fall steelhead in a good high water run on the upper Rogue River. Recent showers have swollen the flow of the river, but the water remains clear. The fly was one of my new stonefly nymph patterns, the “au natural Carpetbagger Nymph.”

Rogue River December Steelhead, Al’s Special Gold Brooch Fly Pin

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December 2nd Rogue River chrome and Cabela’s Spey rod. Rio heads and sink tips.

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Hooked up in the high, grey water of December. December steelhead on my mind.

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Al’s Special gold brooch fly pin. Al Knudson was an early pioneering fly tier of the early 19th Century. He was one of the first to use large flies for winter steelhead. Knudson’s streamer patterns are little remembered today, but surely would fish just as well now as they did in the old days.

Try Fishing the Rogue River Early in the November Cold and Fog.

Rogue Steelhead

Hatchery Heft like the Orange Bead Head Brownbagger Stonefly Nymph.

November Colors

Yarn flies, slight wisp of orange, fished off a Carpetbagger Stonefly Nymph work well now.

Sometimes called “Oh dark oh thirty”, arriving early in the November gloom and mist can pay dividents on the Rogue River, of Oregon.

Rogue River at 2040 CFS (Liking it!) 11/02/16

The water is very clear right now. That was the first thing I noticed, lots of good flow and gin clear. It didn’t take long to find a nice sized cutthroat trout with the Midnight Rainbow Carpetbagger Stonefly Nymph. The first steelhead came to a Brown Fork Tail Prince Nymph. He was a little further downriver in the run. Finally just before the sunset I was able to cast at the “sweet spot” as it became vacant. I was soon on to a nice steelhead. I played the fish well and was giving it a different angle of the rod when the hook came out. No matter, I made a cast to the middle of the run, and on that very next cast I was hooked to an even better steelhead. The buck fought well, lighting up the water with some spectacular runs and leaps. Finally I was able to control those and some other stubborn antics. I tailed the fish and admired the white, crimson and green of his thick sides. Like I said the Rogue River was up and I was, “Liking it!”